Tag Archives: Scotiabank

Banks card security procedures stymie card holder

Pondering the complications of online bank security changes

Both my bank and my credit card company have new security measures for their clients. While I applaud this step, it thumbs down for their procedures to do so. Why? Because they are making it difficult for the avtual card holder to do the changes. I thought these security measures were for our benefit, but if we can’t access our accounts, something is wrong.

Take Scotiabank’s new debit cards. Traditionally, you kept the same debit card, same number for ages (unless the card was stolen, lost, or mangled). I have had the last two happen to my debit card over the years. No problem getting a new card and get it working – including for my online account. And that’s where the problems are now happening. Here’s my story and I’m sticking to it.

Last Friday a new card arrived in the mail. No warning ahead of time from Scotiabank – by regular mail or in an online notification at my account. Remember, old debit cards have no expiry date so unlike credit cards you can’t check to see when the new card is expected to arrive. The new cards do have an expiry date, which will help somewhat for the future. But for now I decided yesterday afternoon to go to my bank in person and get all the changes made.

No problem with changing my card number for in-person banking. But the teller couldn’t change my online account because she didn’t have my password. I didn’t either – on me. I don’t carry my passwords around with me. She explained how I could to change it online. I wasn’t happy about the situation and said that I would have problems.

And boy did I – worse than anticipated. I wasted the rest of the afternoon with this. Starting with my laptop I tried to change the card number in my account but each time I tried to log in it kept going back to the old number and flashing ERROR # etc. at the top. I even changed my password. Didn’t work. So I called Scotiabank customer service and got a very patient helpful rep.

First she tried to help me fix it on the laptop. Didn’t work. Then we tried my desktop computer. At first it kept doing the same return to the old card number and wouldn’t let me in. Finally she had me click on something else and got me to the security questions which are necessary for this change. (That didn’t happen on the laptop). Finally we got in. Because computers are linked when I went to my laptop, I got in to my account immediately.

I thanked her profusely for her patience and help and got the Scotiabank phone no. to put in a complaint. I was very clear that the complaint was not against her or the teller but against the card being changed with a changed number  at all without any notice and the setup up for changing it on line (Instructions not in the cover letter with the card from Scotiabank). Again I got a sympathetic bank rep (so far – we’ll see what the result of my complaint brings). Again I was clear that my complaint was not against the teller or the customer service rep. – if anybody, it would be the assholes (pardon my language – I could use stronger language) who initiated this change and decided on how it would be done.

As for the credit card change – that is another bank and so far all I have done is go online to my account. After I enter the password I get this box about all the new security measures and the procedures for doing so. There are points in it to click on for more info. I did this. But I couldn’t see all the information because you couldn’t scroll down the pdf.

So I phoned to get some help. Got through to someone called Sarah right away and complained about the faulty design. She agreed and put me on hold and never came back. I was on hold for over 15 minutes before hanging up. Definitely I will be putting in a complaint about Sarah – if I can get through. I’m still mulling over whether to cancel my card and get another one from another bank….but why should I have to do this?

What do you think of this? Is security getting too complicated for the card holders to get around? Or am I just a luddite?

Cheers.

Sharon

Only Child Writes

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Bank service, Bank service complaints, Banking, Consumer action

Only Child asks: Is this good customer service? Part 1

Your customer service rep today

Customer service is becoming non-existent in my life if the past two weeks are any indication. Here is one of those real stories.

The Bank and the Safety Deposit Box

For 19 years I have had a safety deposit box at the same bank branch. The box’s location? Floor level. Not great for a senior with bad knees and bad feet and a bad temper when the first two act up.

So, I decided I would get the box changed to one higher up. Might as well get up in the world.

Well, pardon my knees – maybe I should have gotten down on them and screamed bloody murder.

No one at the bank branch seemed to know what the procedure was. First time near the end of the rental year for the floor box, when I went in about it, a teller told me to come in a few days before the actual fiscal year end. So I did and those who should know better were running around like the proverbial chicken with no head – except the chicken would score higher on the intelligence level.

The teller didn’t know but at least had the sense to check with Debbie, the Customer Service Manager. Debbie didn’t know how to close it either. Isn’t it her job to know the ins and outs of customer service? I was told that only the teller named Tina knew what to do and to come back the day it closes and she could do it all then.

It was beginning to sound like some secret ritual.

So I showed up the last day of the rental contract, the last day I could pay. Tina was there and transferred my payment from my chequing account. Tina tried to close the account and open a new one so the box could be moved.

The computer couldn’t do it. Tina said it would have had to be done a few days before and I said I did come in then but nobody knew what to do. She figured it would work on the Monday so said to come in then. Monday arrived and I was too busy with writing work (and dealing with other snafus – for another post), so decided to be courteous and call the branch and leave a message for Tina.

And ran into recorded voice mail hell. You can no longer just leave a voice mail message for someone at the bank branch. You get this female robot voice asking what you want – of course their less than pea-sized robotic brain has a limited number of what they will recognize. So the voice asked for my bank card number. Which I gave her. She said it wasn’t recognized and I immediately got back to square one when you call in.

I ended up calling the main line, complaining, and a very nice and smart representative named Dennis got me transferred to the branch…to Debbie, the customer service manager – oh excuse me, her voice mail. So I just left a message to pass along to Tina that I couldn’t come in today and was just calling as a courtesy. Tina called back shortly and I said I couldn’t come in before Friday but she wasn’t going to be in Friday. Friday is the only way this damn bank branch is open to 6 p.m. and I couldn’t see why I should steal from my work time to waste time at a bank because they don’t know what they are doing.

So I went in around 3 p.m. Thursday and got into the line. The manager, Vince, was walking by and I told him loudly all about my problem and that only Tina knew what to do to change safety deposit boxes, etc. etc. And that the others, particularly Debbie,  the customer service manager needed some retraining. He apologized – but I wasn’t impressed. He always comes across as an unintelligent jerk – a yes man who doesn’t listen. The previous bank manager, a woman, was so much smarter and helpful. She was quick to straighten out a mess one of her tellers made including writing the utility companies involved to tell them it was a teller’s error and I always pay my bills on time. But she’s not there and we are stuck with Vince and Debbie.

Tina did straighten everything out and I got my new safety deposit box at eye level. Tina also got my up-to-date email where  she said I would receive a survey. and I could tell what happened.

I expected the survey, but not a place to put everything.

The survey, not only had a place for comments about what happened, but asked the question “What would correct this situation?”

My answer? Get rid of Vince; retrain Debbie and train the rest of the staff.

Then I rated them: Tina A+, everyone else at the bank involved F-

Now when I go into the bank branch I’ll be looking to see if Vince is Gone Boy.

There are many more customer service snafu stories in the city of Toronto. Hang on – I’ll be writing more in upcoming posts. No one will be spared and sometimes I will name full names.

Cheers.

Sharon

Only Child Writes

 

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Filed under Actions Consequences, Banking, finances, Problems

Only Child slams bank “service”

Only Child ponders bank disservice

Only Child ponders bank disservice

I don’t physically go to my bank branch very often anymore but when I have to I expect service.

Am I being naive here?

Take this morning. Five minutes after the bank opened, I walked in on this first day of another month. At that point, the waiting lineup wasn’t too bad. (It became worse and longer as I waited). However, there were only two tellers working. The other two wickets were open but no one was there unless the bank (it is Scotiabank by the way.) is hiring invisible tellers.

The bank manager was flitting back and forth from teller to bank patrons, so on his way back to his office I spoke to him and wanted to know why on the first day of a month, a very busy day, there wasn’t a full slot of tellers from 9.30 a.m. (when the bank opens). He said, “another teller is coming in at 10 a.m.).” I blasted him with why all four tellers aren’t in when the bank opens.

“There should be a full slate of tellers from when the bank opens on the first day of the month. When I’ve come in a day or two later the tellers always mention how busy the first day is. And today, I have to go to my safety deposit box and that will leave one teller at the counter.”

After re-iterating that another teller was coming in at 10 a.m., he added, “I’ll keep that into consideration for future months,” he said. Then he passed the buck. He said he would talk to the branch officer in charge of staff and he would have to get permission from head office.

Oh really? He is the bank branch manager, so he should have charge of that.

Oh, I get it, the unspoken words. Bank costs. Let the tellers work part-time and scramble the hours around to cut costs. This doesn’t go with the big profits of Scotiabank. At the end of August, 2016, reports from Scotiabank stated that the bank  had a profit of over $1.9 billion in its third quarter. This amount is up from last year’s $1.8 billion

Something is screwy with all this.

After Mr. Bank Branch Manager returned to his office, I had a discussion with the young woman behind me and  a senior in line behind her. This lady, a retired teacher, had a walker,  but I’m glad she had something to sit in. The three of us agreed with what I complained about to the manager. And I’m not surprised it was me that did the complaining – I’m a former journalist turned unofficial consumer advocate, the latter by necessity.

The safety deposit necessity today  (as it is the beginning of every month) was the only reason I had to go into the bank branch. Usually I pay bills online, through direct payment from bank accounts or credit cards, and the odd one by regular mail. I’m not a fan of ATMs so I do a lot of my “bank withdrawals” using Cash Back at grocery and other stores.

If I could get money from my bank accounts through my computer I would.

Or I could pull a Stephen Leacock, the late Canadian humorous author who wrote a funny piece about a fellow who kept his money in a sock.

Hmm. Might be worth a try. Oh, I guess not, for security reasons. But I wouldn’t need a large sock. Might be a use for one of the odd socks people seem to accumulate.

Comments, please. What are some of your “customer service” experiences with financial institutions?

And that last word “institutions” might just say it all.

Cheers.

Sharon

Only Child Writes

 

 

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Only Child on more government/consumer issues

Only Child gearing up to tackle government depts and companies that screw up her life

Only Child gearing up to tackle government depts and companies that screw up her life

Last Saturday morning was grey, rainy and windy. A perfect premonition for snafus. If that didn’t warn me then my bus being nearly 10 minutes late should have.

It didn’t. And although I put it out there (God, universe – take your pick) to have things work out for getting my Photo ID card – they didn’t. So much for any smidgeon of trust.

No trouble finding the new Service Ontario outlet – a short bus ride from my home. Somewhat long line-up inside but it seemed to move quickly enough – until I got to one of the four wickets.

When I phoned the day before I was told for a photo ID card I needed a birth certificate, my Ontario Health Insurance card and my divorce papers (the latter bridgingthe name change gap as well as giving certified dates of marriage and divorce.)

The latter two were no problem. The unfriendly government employee behind the counter said my original birth certificate wasn’t valid – I needed one issued by the City of Toronto and this one looked like a church one – was it?

“I wouldn’t know; I was a baby then,” I replied.

Then I pointed out that the title said “Birth Certificate” and the part where the issuer was the City of Toronto in the County of York (back in the grey ages) and that it was signed by a Toronto City registrar. She wouldn’t buy it so faxed a copy to her superior in the downtown office. This “superior  idiot” agreed with her. She said that it was issued by a hospital. Now there was no indication of a hospital issuing it and if that were true, it should be valid. Even as late as 1978 when my son was born, his original certificate came from the hospital (but has all the city – Newmarket here – info on it.). In the 1980s I used my original paper birth certificate to obtain the laminated one the Ontario Government were creating and this ***hole Service Ontario employee stated that the laminated ones were valid.

Why has the original paper birth certificate worked for proof of birth elsewhere?

Why has the Ontario government been considering chucking issuing new laminated birth certificates? What will they accept then? Invisible birth certificates?

The photo ID is supposed to be for those of us who don’t have a driver’s licence and costs much less. Is what happened to me a variation of being discriminated against because I don’t drive?

I have a laminated birth certificate. Yesterday I took it (and other ID cards) out of my safety deposit box. They were all in there for safety purposes – the police tell us to do this instead of carrying them around with us or leaving them lying around in our homes in case of b and e’s and/or muggings.

But with government stupidity it looks like you have to constantly carry them around. You never know when you might need them.

I talked to a few people at the CARP Zoomer show (for adults 45 plus) Sunday and was told to complain to the Ontario Ombudsman and the Ministry of Consumer Affairs. Will do – once I get my damn ID card and get all the other becoming senior issues and procedures done.

For the record, at this point here are my lists – gratitude/good companies/government depts. And my *hit list of the baddies. Note: some get on both lists – short explanation in brackets afterwards.

Only Child’s Gratitude Good Companies/Government Depts.

  1. Service Canada – phone and in person, in particular one branch at Gerrard and Pape in Toronto – others praise their helpfulness, friendliness. What government service should be like.
  2. Dell Canada (in part – for being able to lease laptops for years at a continually reduced monthly rate)
  3. Sears Canada (in part – Optical Department, Home Services – particularly window blinds – and watch repair)
  4. State Farm (they handle my house and business insurance and did a good job switching the former to monthly payments)
  5. Kristin Green and Associates (manage my website and domain and I have two email accounts connected to this) – despite their switchover to a new server, after my email request for help, Kristin phoned me back and walked me through any changes to my accounts that I couldn’t do. And explained it all in a friendly helpful manner.
  6. Scotiabank – for usually being helpful – and they accepted my original paper birth certificate for eliminating some costs for seniors

Only Child’s *hit list

  1. Service Ontario – see beginning of blog post.
  2. CRA (Canadian Revenue Agency) – for lack of  knowledge of recent changes to paying taxes with CPP payments – cost me a lot of time and phone running around and delay paying the extra which I was required to pay (but was first told it wasn’t necessary)
  3. Empire Life Insurance Company for never informing me about the setup for my life insurance premium – it’s part investment –  and that there is a built-in what’s it that if you don’t add in extra to cover  increase in premiums you get a letter stating that if you don’t pay the extra by a certain day, your policy is canceled. The kicker? You have to phone them at the end of each fiscal year that you want to increase your premium or they don’t on your bill. I’m looking into other companies’ life insurance premiums where a medical isn’t required and will take this company to the Insurance Bureau of Canada and Ontario Ombudsman for unethical stupid practices. Today I put my foot down and said if they didn’t send me a bill for the real amount owing for the next quarter I’m paying the faulty lower one they just sent – technically and legally I can do that.
  4. Sears Canada (because the idiot new CEO is planning on closing the flagship store in downtown Toronto in the Eaton Centre. That’s my store for optical, etc. Now I’ll have to go further into Toronto outskirts – if they have Sears Optical there for any warranty-covered follow-ups to new eyeglasses which I would get before the anticipated February 2014 closing. Also I like their clothes better than Hudson Bay)
  5.  Direct Energy for trying to tell me my heating protection plan with them was not valid.
  6. Enbridge Canada for closing my account because they thought I moved and some guy named Peter moved in. They mixed up our streets – same name except mine is a Crescent and Peter’s is a Circle. This was two years ago and was fixed after I phoned several times.
  7. All utility companies for raising the rates and putting many of us deeper into the poor house – no matter what we do to save energy.
  8. The Canadian federal and Ontario provincial government for their service-cutting (mostly the feds) and its results and the province’s errors with hydro and gas and making the taxpayer pay (there is a debt repayment amount in our bi-monthly hydro bills).
  9. Dell Canada for screwing up my original new laptop lease order – they didn’t put in the order and wouldn’t admit they made a mistake. But they ordered it again and it is now here.

The list can go on and on, but I think you get the picture.

Cheers.

Sharon A. Crawford

Only Child Writes

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