Tag Archives: Ice Storms

Ice Storms Tornadoes Rain bring havoc to US and Canada

Tree destruction from ice storm

Tree destruction from ice storm

Wicked weather over the January 13 weekend and continuing this week if nothing else proves that we can no longer feel safe in our world – as if most of us didn’t already know that .It is heartbreaking and the icy conditions and tornadoes in the USA and now the ice storms, rainfalls and winds in Ontario from the same storm hit it home harder. So do the  torrential rains coming up to lower British Columbia. These and more (watch The Weather Network, especially the Force of Nature videos clips and that last word in the title is a misnomer and also Accuweather) should serve as a warning that we have to do something about this. Before we can even get -to climate change, first there are the current situations’ damage  that have to be taken care of.

Those last three words are important here. We need to go beyond hope and beyond prayer and get in there and help each other. If the power is out in your neighbourhood, make sure your neighbours are okay and help them  – if you have a generator and gas fireplace and/or gas stove, open your home to those that don’t. I keep thinking of the big southern Ontario ice storm of December 2013 and how my neighbours helped me and how my son, especially helped my then boarder and me by booking (and paying for) a hotel room for a few days in downtown Toronto where the power stayed on. My son, Martin, also took us out to dinner near the hotel, picked us up and drove us home for Christmas (we had the power back on then) and even brought Christmas dinner and helped cook it. Fortunately, I hadn’t opened the big freezer during the power outage, the freezer was full and except for the odd item in the fridge-top freezer and fridge that didn’t make it into my makeshift freezer – an old-fashioned milk shut-turned mailbox on an outside wall, food was okay.

Put salt on your driveway, sidewalks and verandah to melt the ice. As long as the temperature doesn’t go much below freezing it will soften the ice somewhat. Then get out there and move the ice with a sharp shovel. A garden digging shovel works fine. I know some of you with be tut-tutting the choice of salt, but in a situation like this people’s safety is the main thing. If you really want to get all environmentally proactive clearing the ice, use sand, but good luck finding any in winter.

I also have another problem to watch and with me it can happen without the torrential rainfalls in BC. I’m talking about basement flooding. Many properties in the area I live in have this problem due to the area being low level, with old sewers. The City of Toronto is working to remedy this situation but it will take years. See basement flooding program for more info on this.

My problem can happen no matter what the sewer infrastructure is because a contractor named  Nigel Applewaite who I hired to dig the side of the house with the wall cracks and to seal it, didn’t dig down far enough. He won ‘t do anything about it and has blamed it on the sewer drains. I had city workers check that out – twice. Drain was clear.

There was one other thing that developed that has something to do with it – the-eavestrough middle on the east side of the house got mis-shaped into a bow, no doubt from something in “nature” – i.e. extreme weather and/or raccoons.  My handyman noticed it when he put up heating cables there and on the roof. I hired a professional eavestrough company (I checked with three of them) last year to fix it. The eavesgtrough needed re-aligning. So far it seems to be helping, but I keep an eye on my basement floors and heavy towels on the floors under two windows are a permanent part of the decor. Today, with heavy rains and winds from the east I am doing regular checks of my basement and there better not be any water get in.

One thing all this weather damage does to you. If you’ve lived through it, you become wary and worried, sometimes to the point of paranoia.

Another reason to help your family, friends and neighbours when extreme weather hits. They say misery loves company. But so does picking up after all the misery. It is being pro-active together, much better than burying your face in whatever. Much better than doing something to relax. You need to take action and sometimes the adrenalin from the worry and the bad surprise can act as a catalyst for strength to try to fix the situation.

Just think if a group of neighbours, friends, etc. all work together towards this.

Fix the current disaster, then move on to climate change action. Do it in steps from the beginning.

And yes, I haven’t forgotten that governments and corporations have to do their part too. Some are.

But that’s a topic for another blog post.

As for Nigel Applewaite, he has had flooding in the basement and garage of his home. Sometimes what goes around does actually come around if we just let it.

Be safe.

Cheers.

Sharon

Only Child Writes

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Filed under Climate Change, Extreme Weather, Faulty Contractors, Floods, Helping Others, Hydro power outage, Ice Storms, Life demands, Only child, Rain and wind storm

Only Child finds nothing pretty about winter

Winter's misery has landed

Winter’s misery has landed

Bah humbug. Winter is here way too early. Again. Some of the maple trees still have leaves. If I sound like the Grinch that’s how I feel about winter. I don’t ski, snowshoe, snowboard, skido or skate. And I hate the cold. Looking at all that white stuff out there does nothing for my soul. Snow requires shovelling.

The other thing I see when I look out my front window is my poor juniper tree, still showing some of its damage from the bitter cruel winter of last year. God gave us this “wonderful” weather which damaged many trees and other garden shrubs. I’m still waiting for him to do the right thing and fix the damage he caused/let happen.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m grateful that some of my juniper came back. But it wasn’t two thirds of it like I asked God. More like one third.

So, we now have at least six months of winter misery to worry about all the variety of nasty weather we can get – you know, not just old-fashioned snow in moderate amounts, but blizzards, rain-snow mixes that aren’t only snow flurries and rain, heavy blustery winds, sleet and the most dreaded – ice storms.

We don’t want any of the latter in particular. But because it happened last winter here in southern, south western and eastern Ontario, it can happen again.

It better not.

So, I will focus on writing, cooking, indoor gardening, friends, family, book promo and the like. And venture out when I have to, including trying to get in some walking on a near-daily basis.

But I worry about our trees, homes, etc.

No matter where you live in this world it is not safe from God’s weather destruction.

No wonder I want to go back in time – even to the late 1990s when all was not lost in our world – yet.

 

Cheers.

Sharon A. Crawford

Only Child Writes

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Filed under Extreme Weather, Home and Garden, Ice Storm Southern Ontario, Ice storm Toronto, Only child, Sharon A. Crawford, Snow, Trees and Shrubs, Uncategorized, Weather, winter falls, Winter Weather

Only Child says winters no longer fun and Memoir Writing

Only Child  rests before doing more battle with companies screwing the consumer

Only Child contemplates winters back then and now.

As we drag ourselves kicking and screaming through this horrible winter that keeps on dumping, I can’t help remembering normal winters like the ones when I was growing up in the 50s and 60s. Actually even up to the last nine or 10 years, winters still were somewhat normal. But to go back to “then” as we do when writing memoir, here is an excerpt from my memoir about what winter had to offer and how Mom, Dad and I enjoyed winter. It’s about ice-skating also appropriate because of the current Winter Olympics at Sochi.

When I was six, Mom and Dad did collaborate when they decided I needed to learn to ice skate. Dad made the ice rink and Mom got me moving on it.

Dad turns on the hose and out pours cold water. Overnight it freezes on the dormant grass in the backyard. I never think how the water passes through the hose. Wouldn’t it be frozen? Did Dad put his ear to the radio and listen to the weather reports to see when the daytime temperature sat around freezing (32 degrees Fahrenheit then) or just below? When night falls, so does the temperature and in the morning – magic – instant skating rink.

Then Dad turns it over to Mom. Like a dance instructor trying to teach steps to a nervous wannabe, she grabs my hands and tries to get me in motion.

“Come on Sharon. Just slide your feet, one foot in front of the other.”

My feet, tucked tightly into new white figure skates, scrape and totter along the ice and my fingers dig into her hands, my mittens no protection for the hard petrified squeeze they give her. I do not want to fall. I might break a leg. I’m terrified of losing control, so I continue to cling to Mom as she steps backward, sometimes in her rubber boots and sometimes in an old pair of Dad’s black hockey skates. I follow forward like a drunken clown.(Excerpted from You Can Go Home, Copyright 2014, Sharon A. Crawford)

You can see how I felt then about skating on ice. But it was a positive experience. So, let’s put it forward to compare with my feelings on winter today.

This winter, especially the great ice storm that hit southern Ontario from Dec. 22, 2013 has left me feeling that our world is no longer safe – anywhere. We constantly have to be on hyper-guard, especially with the weather. I felt scared to panicky, and yes very angry that this is what got thrown at us (and you can take your pick where/who to put the blame for this). Skating was not something to look forward to as everywhere you went there was ice. I no longer have my ice skates and probably in my senior years would wobble around and fall.

So the only positive spin I can put on winter is the Olympics at Sochi, especially the figure skating. And I wish Patrick Chan, Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir had won gold, but I’m still proud they won silver.

If you are in the Toronto, Ontario Canada area and want to learn more about writing a memoir, I am teaching a memoir writing workshop, Saturday, February 22, 2014, 9.30 a.m. to 4.30 p.m..  Here are some details:

Getting your Memoir off the Ground:

Presented by the East End Writers’ Group

Always wanted to write your family’s story or your story but need some motivation and guidance? Sharon A. Crawford, who conducts Memoir Writing workshops for the Toronto Public Library, will teach this one-day expanded workshop on Memoir Writing. After a brief review of kick-starting your memoir using the senses, this hands-on workshop takes the writer into the nitty-gritty of writing the memoir. You will learn how to organize your memoir’s content, do research and work it into your memoir, deal with family flak, and not only start writing your memoir, but write an actual chapter and have it critiqued.  Handouts provided. Bring photos and other memorabilia, pen and paper or the electronic equivalent.

Check out the full details on my website at www.samcraw.com (click on Speaker’s Bureau).

Cheers.

Sharon A. Crawford

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Filed under 1950s, 1960s, Ice Skating, Ice storm Toronto, Mom and Dad, Only child memoir, Winter Weather