Only Child looks at new way of grocery shopping

vegetables-for-saleDo you like to pick out your fresh fruit and bread yourself at the grocery store? Do you hate crowded grocery stores and long line-ups at the checkout?

Loblaw has started a pilot project called “click and collect” to fix the former but you give up the personal touch. For a small fee, you can pre-order your groceries at certain Loblaw stores online using your smart phone or computer. But, you still have to go through Loblaw’s products online to choose, then go to the store to pick up your groceries, although the store’s personal shopper will bring it to your car. The scenario could even get as silly as you sitting in your car in the grocery parking lot and ordering your groceries from your i-phone. Doesn’t make sense to me. If I’m going to order groceries online from home, I want the store to deliver them to my door. I still have to pay extra either way. I also like to choose the fresh products myself. And what about if the store is out of a product that is not on sale. Can’t get a rain cheque for that.

When I was growing up we had three grocery stores within walking distance to choose from, although we lost one to a beer store. Still two left. Many people walked to grocery stores and wheeled their purchases in a bundle buggy. That’s what my late mom did except when she sent me to pick up a few things such as bread and milk. I made a point of shopping at Loblaw then because they had a huge magazine rack in the veggie and fruit department. I liked to stand there and flip through the movie star magazines and sometimes I even bought one.

After Dad died, Mom sold the house and we moved into a nearby two-bedroom apartment. I was working then so got into the grocery-shopping act. As I write in my memoir

I’m giving her part of my salary to pay for the food and with her help, I’m learning to plan menus and do a grocery list, based on the specials at the different grocery stores. I wheel the bundle buggy up the street to the IGA and sometimes if I’m early enough I don’t need the buggy – they will deliver. Or I go further up the street to the Loblaw’s. (Excerpted from You can Go Home – Deconstructing the Demons, Copyright 2014,  Sharon A. Crawford.)

Back then you ordered (by phone) from the Sears or Eaton’s catalogues and not food except maybe Christmas cake and candies. For groceries, you got off your derriere and went into the store, picked out your food, etc., went through the check-out and brought your groceries home. The only deliveries to your door were bread, milk and ice. Yes, I said “ice.” One of the neighbours down the street still had ice delivered – this was in the mid-1950s.

Methinks this new Loblaw’ trial project caters to people with cars, and smart phones, too. Although you can order from your home computer. But news flash Mr. Galen Weston Jr. and other big whigs at Loblaw’s. Many of us use public transit and our feet to bring our groceries home. If you are going to go the pre-order route, why not add in the delivery? Other grocery stores do – like Longo through Grocery Gateway.

Otherwise it is like having half the ingredients, half the service, half the experience.

And it is still work for the customer.

For stories on this new service go to

http://www.thestar.com/business/2014/10/24/loblaw_launches_clickandcollect_service.html

and

http://metronews.ca/news/canada/1164433/loblaws-preparing-drive-thru-groceries-pilot-project/

Cheers.

 

Sharon A. Crawford

Only Child Writes

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Filed under 1950s, Fresh produce, Grocery Shopping, Loblaw Click and Collect pilot project, Sharon A. Crawford, Shopping

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